Indian Puppetry!

It will be hard to find a child who has not heard of puppets. They may be known by different names in different areas, but puppets have, for centuries, enthralled children across the world. The first puppets are estimated to have originated nearly 3000 years ago. They are used for the primary purpose of story-telling and nowadays, it is also used to spread awareness about socially relevant topics. For instance, Ranjana Kanitkar’s organization first used puppets as a means to raise the voice against child marriage.

As far as the Indian subcontinent is concerned, there is slight evidence of puppetry in the Indus valley Civilization. One terracotta doll with a detachable head capable of movement was unearthed by archaeologists and it is believed to be nearly 2500 years old.

Various ancient literature such as the Mahabharata, Tamil epics, Ashokan edicts, Natya Sashtra, etc. have mentions of puppetry. Mahabharata, for instance, has a number of allusions to puppetry, the most famous one being from the Gita which talks of the three qualities, Sattah, Rajah and Tamah compared to three strings being pulled by the Divine to lead men in life. In the Kamasutra, it was revealed that the best way to entertain and seduce young girls was to organize a puppet show and present the puppets to the damsels after the performance!! The treatise contains elaborate descriptions on the making of puppets.

Puppets are used frequently in folklore. These puppets are made to imbibe all the expressions of humans thus making them as an extension of human expression. Ancient India considered them as a form of divine creation. Even today, a puppeteer opens his show with prayers. When the show is over, he puts the puppets reverentially aside.

When a puppet has to be discarded, it is not thrown away. Instead, they are floated away in rivers after performing a religious ceremony. And it happens only in India.

We shall come back with more. Till then stay tuned to TriveniTimes!

Authored by Jijo George

Indian sweets, an assortment of shapes and colours!

He who is worshiped with the onset of every new auspicious thing loves, adores and is very fond of Modaks. And we are sure you would have heard “Ganpati Bappa Moriya” every morning and evening, for past few weeks especially if you are residing in the western part of India.

Our very own designer modaks with sweet filling inside made up of fresh grated coconut and jaggery. Sounds delicious!!! Doesn’t it? But before we get our mouths watering let’s take a look at the sweets offering more designs and features to talk about.

They aren’t small apples, they are sweets with Black Cumin embedded as stems.

           

         

Flower shaped “Jangiri” from South, popularly known as “Imarti”  in North. But folks, don’t jumble it up with the round shaped Jalebis. Moon shaped kaaju barfi, and lotus shaped sweet.

How sweet!! :)

That’d be about shapes, glimpsing the colours now…

 

Chocolaty delicious gulaab jaamun, Rosaceous barfi and green as grass chakki.

But there’s more to it from the skilled artisans of India, we popularly call “Halwaais”  :)

  

You must hurry up to the nearest Mithaai shop,
while Triveni Times cooks some more delicious stuffs, just for you.

Authored by: Pragya Banka

Application of Traditional Embroidery Techniques in Contemporary Fashion [Take #4]

Stone Work

Stone work is an ancient embroidery technique in which small gems or stones are sewn onto the fabric. Stone work is actually used to highlight other forms of embroidery. In ancient times, real precious and semiprecious stones were used along with beads and pearls and it was a very expensive form of embroidery. Nowadays crystals and semiprecious stones are used. Stones can be used alone as a centerpiece or in formation of lines and other various ways. The stones give an extra sense of physical realism to the embroidery.stone

The beauty of this fabulous violet chiffon saree is accentuated by the intricate stone-work embroidery done in silver. A great look for weddings and parties, this saree is a must-have for the modern Indian woman. Pair it with your favourite crystal jewellery and be the star of the show.stone ex3

This graceful white salwar suit gives the wearer a pure and divine aura. The glittery white stone-work on a pristine white background adds glamour to the entire ensemble. A stark red border acts as an attractive contrast. This suit is the perfect attire for parties, weddings and formal occasions

Stone ex2

This glamorous georgette saree has intricate stone work embroidery done all over the bright magenta body which is contrasted by a bottle green border. The attire is elegant, modern and fashionable all at the same time. This saree is an excellent evening-wear for parties. It is a sleek, modern saree for the modern Indian woman.

Stone ex1

Effectively contrasting the bright green body of this saree with rich red pleats makes this saree very attractive. Heavy stone-work embroidery on the border and all over the body adds glitz and glamour to the look. The unique design of this saree is intriguing and eye-catching. Match with your favourite pair of crystal ear-rings and look fabulous in any occasion.stone ex4

We will be back soon with more. Till then stay tuned to Triveni

Authored by Oindrila Mandal

Application of Traditional Embroidery Techniques in Contemporary Fashion [Take #3]

Check out another edition of Fusion of Embroidery Tradition & Contemporary Fashion

Resham Embroidery
Resham is an Urdu and Hindi word for ‘Silk.’ The difference between Resham and Silk is that Resham is the untwisted thread in a raw form of silk. Resham embroidery involves sewing of untwisted threads of Silk which are dyed in different colours, onto Sarees, Lehengas and other clothing to form brocade, or to be used as an embroidery design.resham 2

Silk embroidery originated in China

From there the use of Silk as a thread for creating complete brocade spread to various countries including Persia. The Persians brought the technique to India when they migrated to Saurashtra and Gujarat. The Silk embroidery technique introduced by them went on to be known as Resham. The special feature of resham embroidery is the elaborated and complex designs and patterns. The designs or patterns which are mostly used in resham embroidery are floral and paisley shapes. resham

Look as fabulous as Kangana Ranaut by wearing this stylish Silk Anarkali suit. The deep rich Magenta colour heightens the beauty of the wearer. The heavy Resham embroidery work on the top and the border gives the suit a royal aura. Excellent attire for traditional parties.

Triveni continues to design ethnic clothes for the modern woman. This beautiful black salwar kameez uses heavy Resham work in bright gold thread. The contrast between the base colour and the golden thread gives this item an ethereal feel. It is a very sober, traditional garment which is great for wearing in formal occasions.

Resham salwar

This gorgeous purple Lehenga Saree is from Triveni’s Wedding collection. The entire fabric is covered with intricate Resham Embroidery done with contrasting gold thread. A perfect blend of ethnicity and modernity, this regal attire is the perfect wedding-wear for the modern woman.Resham lehenga

This attractive green Resham embroidered saree is a great example of Indian cultural heritage. The traditional motif and patterns embroidered on the bright green chiffon are reminiscent of the Benarasi Resham embroidery designs. This is a perfect saree for traditional events.

Resham saree 1

Authored by Oindrila Mandal

Till next time.

Application of Traditional Embroidery Techniques in Contemporary Fashion [Take #2]

We are back with our next entry of Application of traditional embroidery in contemporary fashion.

Zardozi or Zari

The most opulent form of Indian embroidery is Zardozi, popularly known as Zari. This technique originated in Central Asia in the 16th Century and was brought to India by the Mughal invaders. The word Zardozi comes from the Persian words “Zari” which means “gold” and “Dozi” which means “embroidery”.

Zari 2
Zari work was traditionally done with metal wires, usually gold or silver coloured thread. The embroidered cloth is embellished with pearls, precious stones, spangles, beads, gota and kinari. In ancient India, real gold and silver thread was often used on silk, brocade or velvet which made Zadozi affordable only to the rich and mighty. Nowadays substitute metallic or synthesized thread is used. But Zardozi still remains a symbol of extravagance in modern India.Zari 3

 

Triveni has a vast collection of Zari work merchandise.

This green and magenta zari-work lehenga choli is absolutely entrancing. Here zari embroidery has been artfully used to create a beautiful border in rich golden thread. It is a great piece to wear on weddings and traditional celebrations.Zari Lehenga Choli

 

This gorgeous Anarkali suit is an excellent example of heavy Zardozi work. The use of rich gold zari on a contrasting deep blue background gives the suit a regal feel. This is a fabulous piece from the Triveni Wedding Collection. Pairing it with heavy gold jewellery will ensure that you shine the brightest in the most special day of your life.Zari anarkali

 

This traditional zari embroidered red saree is an excellent example of how Triveni continues to imbue its designs with ethnic Indian sensibilities. The bright gold and silver Zari work makes the broad border contrast with the rich red fabric. This saree is meant for wearing in traditional occasions and festivals. Wear it with bangles and a bright red bindi to flaunt the classic Indian look.Zari sari1

 

This beautiful zari embroidered saree is a perfect example of how traditional embroidery techniques can be used to create fashionable pieces for the modern Indian woman. The intricate zari work on the bright magenta blouse and border adds glamour and the demure green body tones it down to create the perfect balance of traditional and modern fashion. A collector’s item, this piece is great for evening parties and social gatheringsZari saree2.

 

Triveni’s Zardozi extravaganza is not only limited to women’s fashion. It expands to cover various other items, apparels and accessories. A great example is this royal Teal coloured Feta with intricate golden Zari work. It is designed for the modern Indian man in a traditional setting.

Zari turban

 

 

Authored by Oindrila Mandal

Application of Traditional Embroidery Techniques in Contemporary Fashion [Take #1]

Kantha Stitch

Kantha is the traditional embroidery technique of Bengal. It applies the simplest stitch in the language of embroidery, the running stitch to make beautiful borders, shapes and motifs. It was traditionally used as a technique to mend old clothes and make blankets. This style of embroidery also uses the darn stitch, satin stitch, loop stitch and stem stitch.

Kantha

Kantha

 

This stylish jacket is the perfect blend of ethnicity and modern fashion. Application of traditional Kantha stich of Bengal gives it a unique identity. This iconic jacket shrouds the wearer in an aura of mystery. It is great item for making a bold fashion statement.

Kantha example

Kantha Work

Mirror Work
Mirror work is a highly intricate form of embroidery that involves sewing disc shaped mirrors in the fabric. Originating in Gujarat and Rajasthan, this embroidery technique is also called Sheeshedar. It has many slightly differing variants across Gujarat like Hir Bharat, Kutchi Bharat, Kathi etc. Mirror work generally displays big bold embroidery patterns on colourful background fabrics.

Gujarati mirror

Gujarati mirror

The bold embroidery patterns of Gujarati mirror work have been artfully used to metamorphose this saree into an elegant and chic every-day wear garment. Bright pink and green Kutchi Bharat embroidery on a contrasting blue background instantly attracts attention. The small mirrors sown to a thin border gives it a modern look.

Gujrati Mirror work

Gujrati Mirror work

Lace Work
Lace, though European by origin, has long ago been adopted by the Indian culture and successfully integrated into our traditional garments. Lace and Crochet work is now predominant in many regions of India. Entire Industries are now based on lace work. Indianization of this Western technique is truly an interesting phenomenon.

Lacework

Lacework

Triveni has created a wonderful line of lace-work clothes. A splendid example is this gorgeous red and black Kurta done entirely in delicate lace. The beautiful design in contrasting colours makes this an attractive collectors’ item. This Kurta is fashionable and traditional at the same time. It is great as an evening wear or party-wear.

Lace example

Lace Suit

Authored by Oindrila Mandal

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Fusion of Embroidery Tradition & Contemporary Fashion: North India

India, the land of cultural diversity gave birth to a plethora of embroidery styles.

In the North we have the elegant ‘Kashmiri Kashida’ famously used in shawls, drapes, salwar-kameez and woollen-kurtas. This style uses a combination of the chain stitch, the slanted darn stitch, the stem stitch and the herring-bone stitch on a fabric of wool or cotton.

Pic1.jpeg

The ‘Phulkari’ stitch of Punjab and Haryana literally means ‘Flower-work’. Phulkari darn stitch is generally done on a base of dull hand-spun or Khadi cloth with brightly coloured threads that cover the material completely, leaving no gaps. It always follows a regular geometric pattern as shown below.pic2

‘Chikankari’ is a famous Indian embroidery technique that originated in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh during the Mughal-era inspired by Persian crafts. The word ‘Chikan’ is derived from the Persian word ‘Chakeen’ which translates as ‘elegant pattern on the fabric’. This style currently applies over 30 different stitches including back-stitch, chain-stitch and hem-stitch. The ‘Chikan’ is an open work pattern of Jali (lace) or shadow-work consisting of mesh-like sections.pic3

Triveni applies these ancient traditional embroidery techniques to create fashionable ethnic garments.
This gorgeous black Salwar Kameez is covered with beautiful, heavy Kashida embroidery. Use of bright pink and gold threads on a contrasting rich black fabric adds glamour and shine to the entire ensemble. Match it with your favourite gold accessories and it becomes the perfect attire for traditional celebrations and festive occassions.pic4

Phulkari Stitch in contrasting colours renders a royal feel to this yellow Salwar Kameez. Use of brightly coloured threads on a complementary light background makes it instantly attractive. It is excellent attire for daytime formal events. Use of peacock hues and motifs in blues and greens add an artistic touch.pic5

The tasteful application of Chikankari gives this modern Salwar Kameez a timeless classic look. Delicate Chikankari with light green thread-work embossed on a matching background is elegance re-defined. The suit is perfect as a formal office-wear and for everyday use.

pic6

 

Triveni has lot more to say about Incredible India, we will be back soon, so stay tuned to TriveniTimes

Authored by Oindrilla Mandal